2019 Book Reviews

At the beginning of the year, I decided that I wanted to commit to reading more this year (I guess you could call it a New Year’s resolution). I used to be a HUGE reader; flying through whole series in a week as a kid. High school and university pretty much killed my enjoyment of and time for reading (classic story) and I’ve just never had the desire to really start picking up books again. But another resolution of mine was to stop watching so much Netflix, so I figured books could substitute some of that Netflix time. My goal was to read 2-3 books a month, which might seem like a lot to some but honestly I read books so fast. I compiled my list from bestsellers, friend’s recommendations, celebrity reading lists (thanks Reese & Barack), or books I’ve been wanting to read for a long time but haven’t. Although there is a wide variety of fiction/non-fiction, and all different categories/topics; I am focusing a bit on books written by women or people of colour. I’ve been posting my book reviews to Instagram, but figured it might be nice to save them here too! I’ll add my new reviews at the end of each month.

Happy reading!


JANUARY

The Broken Ladder by Keith Payne (4/5)

This is a book about inequality and poverty, but not in the way you’d expect. Although it has a good chunk of economic principles in it, it is written by a psychologist who focused not just what being poor does to a person but what FEELING poor does. It creates an interesting social commentary then on the way (mostly western) governments work (or dont) and provides a new perspective on”the poverty trap”. The author also comes from a background of poverty, so it isn’t just some rich white man telling you why people are poor. Read this if you’re looking to better understand American poverty, inequality, human behaviour, or how to make the world a better place. It left me feeling more compassionate towards others and with a new understanding about the psychology of inequality.

Everything’s Trash, But It’s Okay by Phoebe Robinson (2/5)

First of all, Phoebe, I am very sorry for the low rating, I really wanted to like this (but I didn’t even finish it). The biggest problem for me is that she is a podcastor and it’s written like reading a podcast. Slang, tangents, acronyms – it’s fun but its a mess. I think I would’ve WAY preferred to listen to her podcast or even do the audio book version of this. That being said, she is funny, but I was hoping for something a bit more… revolutionary? I think I just generally went into this with the wrong expectations. Read this if you want some funny short stories about being a single, 30-something, black woman, who is a comedian and a feminist. And if you can read a book written with Cardi B style acronyms, sounds, and random made up words.

Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (4/5)

I had NO clue about Trevor Noah’s backstory and it is MUCH different than your average celebrity. His perspective on race and growing up during the South African apartheid is unique and fresh. If you think that “not seeing race” is a thing, this book will rock your word. It is an autobiography but it reads more like fiction – he is a great writer. Only dislikes, I wish the storyline was a bit more linear and I wish he talked about how he went from a life of crime on the streets of South Africa to hosting a talk show in LA (but to be fair, it’s supposed to be about his childhood). Read this if you want to learn more about race/racism, South African history, inequality, or just a cool story. You will end up loving both Trevor and his mom.


FEBRUARY

We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter (5/5)

Let me just start by saying, I do not like historical fiction, especially from “war time eras”. I just don’t like reading about wars? That may sound bad but just not my thing. However, Queen Reese Witherspoon recommended this book to me (not personally) so I was like okay I’ll read it and it was GOOD. Despite not liking the genre at all, it was a pager turner and I enjoyed reading it. Great story and great characters; which are ACTUALLY BASED OFF OF THE AUTHORS REAL LIVE GRANDPARENTS/GREAT GRANDPARENTS AND THEIR STORIES. So essentially this is the book I want Mark to write about his own family history but that’s beside the point. I gave this book a five because I have no complaints, because I liked it even though I normally wouldn’t have chosen it, AND it gave me a new appreciation/perspective on what Jewish families went through during WW2. You can always trust Reese.

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (2/5)

The whole time I was reading this book I was just thinking, “man my Gr.12 English teacher would’ve loved this book”. And that was pretty much it. It felt like the type of book that your English teacher just finds endless symbolism in but isn’t too exciting to actually read. The ending however, was more interesting but honestly made me feel uncomfortable. Essentially white western missionaries come into their African community and destroy relationships/people/culture. Hard to read when you ARE a “white western missionary” – but hard truths about how colonialism negatively impacted so many communities that can’t be ignored. These are things I am truing to learn more about, even when it’s uncomfortable. This was not the reason for the low rating – I just didn’t love the book! However, it was one of Barack Obama’s top reads from last year so I feel like that praise matters more than mine.

Emboldened by Tara Beth Leach (4.75/5)

I think this book is pretty much a must read for everyone (male or female) in Christian leadership. It describes itself as “a vision of empowering women in ministry” and it is; it is not angry or argumentative, it is big dreams and kingdom vision. Tara Beth is inspiring (and not just because she is a 34 year old woman who is the senior pastor of a mega church) but because she has a vision of what the church could look like when everyone was empowered to use the gifts God gave them. The ONLY thing I think she missed was an acknowledgement of race. Yes, it is harder for a woman to be in a position of leadership than a man, but I would imagine it would be 10x harder for a woman of colour, or even an man of colour. I wished she had just acknowledged this or maybe even recognized how her race still gives her a leg up on some others? This is something I’ve been thinking about recently, so I think it was just on my mind, and therefore noticed it missing. Still loved it and a recommended read for all in Christian leadership, especially young women wondering how they fit in.

Jesus Feminist by Sarah Bessey (5/5)

I’ve just finished this book and already want to re-read it. This book isn’t just about feminism (and whatever that word means/looks like to you). This book is about Jesus. This book is about the Kingdom of God. This book is about what I want my life to look like. There are so many good things in here that stretch way beyond advocating for women’s rights; because although that is important, the goals of the Kingdom are bigger! This book is FULL of love and grace and gentle wisdom and encouragements. It is a call to think bigger and to dive deep into the things God is calling you into. It is a challenge to the status quo and weaknesses in our churches. it is a call to justice, and radical love, and Jesus. She also admits that she does not have all the answers, and that there are no step by step easy solutions. Like I said, this book reminded me of what I want my life to look like (in all the big ways and the boring little ways too).


 

MARCH

Commonwealth by Ann Patchett (3/5)

My biggest (and perhaps only) complaint is that this book has 10 main characters and they all tell pieces of the story from their own points of view over the course of 60-ish years and that non of it is in order. Ahhhh! Not to mention, there are so many marriages and divorces and remarriages and step-siblings and step-children that I actually considered writing it down to keep track of who was who. I do tend to scan when I read but there were lots of times when I had to reread and try to remember who was who and what had happened and how it fit together. Oh boy. Other than that major inconvenience, it was well written lol. It’s basically about families and how they’re complicated. The characters are well written and the author has depth but it wasn’t necessarily exciting and it was unnecessarily confusing. Had some beautiful little bits about family relationships but overall, meh.

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling (5/5)

Bill Gates said, this book is “one of the most important books I’ve ever read – an indispensable guide to thinking clearly about the world”, and he was dead on. Guys, I minored in International Development in university – taking courses in economics, global politics, geography, etc. so I thought I already *knew* a lot about the state of the world. I was wrong! And you are probably wrong too! This book reveals all the false narratives we believe about the world, how “the others” live, “developing countries”, global statistics, etc. and it does it clearly, humbly, intelligently, and with compassion. it shows us how things can be bad and better at the same time, and how most things (education, peace, health, poverty, etc) are really better than you think – while also not leaving any room for the excuse of letting up because things are “good enough”. An essential read for anyone interested in politics, world issues, journalism, life, hope, or actually knowing what’s going on, AND one of Barack Obama’s top book picks for 2018. (If you are not convinced, the author was a medical doctor, a professor, an advisor for UNICEF and WHO, and listed as one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. He died in 2017 right before this book was completed by his children, who have won awards for data analysis and work for Google’s international data team. These people know what they are talking about and they talk about EVERYTHING in this book; vaccines, coral reefs, poverty, terrorism, nuclear war, education… I basically just did a second review in brackets so you should probably just read it).

Educated by Tara Westover (4.75/5)

I’m sure you’ve probably heard of this book. It was on every bestseller list last year when it came out and on tons of celebrity reading lists. It deserves it. If somehow you haven’t read it, add it to your list too. A unique perspective on family, finding yourself, and figuring out the world. A beautifully written story, made more meaningful and surprising because it is a memoir. The type of book that requires some reflection and processing; you’d probably want to read it while curled up with tea instead of by the pool. I think there is only one memoir on my reading list this year that has a shot at surpassing this one (for me) and it’s coming next month 😉

Where The Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens (5/5)

I feel like this was the book that I was waiting for, or maybe that I wanted others to be. I have never leaned much towards general fiction, preferring a bit more mystery or excitement. This book had a wonderfully thoughtful and interesting story – a girl finding herself, raising herself, discovering love and the hardships of life, while also being a MURDER MYSTERY. Yaaaassss. A page turner (I read it in an afternoon – not a humble brag but a testament to an engaging story); both because you want to get to know the main character Kya more, and also because you want to find out what happened the night Chase fell to his death. If you just want a good book – this is the one.

 


APRIL

Becoming by Michelle Obama (5/5)

A BEAUTIFULLY written book. I already liked Michelle Obama (with thoughts like “she seems cool and like she’s doing good things” as she was the First Lady), but after reading this book she has become someone I deeply respect and admire (and not so secretly wish I could be real life friends with). I love her perspectives on parenting, mentorship (something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately but WOW what power there is in investing in someone), marriage, leading as a woman, empowering others, staying true to what you believe in, and believing in what is possible. I also don’t think I’ve ever heard someone diss trump with as much grace. This book is more than just a memoir written by a big name in politics, this is a heartfelt story of resilience and grace. This book is astoundingly well written (it shouldn’t come as a surprise that she’s a good writer because she’s always been well-spoken but what was surprising is that she might be the BEST writer I’ve read this year in terms of how she tells a story, her word choice, and wisdom) and I didn’t want it to end. (Michelle if you’re reading this, can we like, hangout some time?) Read this if you want to be inspired, want to grow a killer vegetable garden, or want to lead with both the grace and power of a First Lady like Michelle Obama.

 


MAY

Why I’m No Longer Talking To White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge (5/5)

Full disclosure: I actually haven’t finished this book yet but I feel like I have a good enough grasp on it to share my thoughts with you. For a while, I’ve been trying to learn more about black history, white privilege, race relations, cultural racism, etc. and have honestly felt overwhelmed. I’ve followed insta accounts, read articles, watched videos, but still felt like I was missing a lot of the bigger picture and didn’t know where to start. This book is where to start. Once I finish it, I’ll probably read it again to be honest, just to let some things soak in and let my perspective continue to shift. Read this book if you want to learn more about what is going on in our society today, if you really want to understand your own privilege and what that means, and the pain of years of racial injustice. It’s just a starting point but honestly this book is THE starting point.

Still Lives by Maria Hummel (4/5)

I think in general, my favourite genre is mystery. In case you hadn’t noticed from my reviews, general fiction “thoughtful” type books aren’t really my thing haha. This book has all the essentials of a good mystery. Good character development, secret motives, a twist, but nothing to really make it stand out from the crowd. Its theme of violence against women and art is supposed to be a commentary on our society I think, but it kind of made me feel creeped out (and not in a good scary way but like, life is scary for women type way). A good summer read if you’re into mystery. Don’t read if you have any history or trauma related to violence against women or stalkers. I gave it a four because it was a good read but like if you were only going to read one book this summer don’t pick this once.

Women Talking by Miriam Toews (3/5)

This book would have been much better if something actually happened haha. Like, the whole book is spent discussing a plan, but you never get to see that plan carried out which I think would’ve made for a way more interesting story. Still lots of thought provoking themes and an interesting dilemma they work through but severely lacking in action.

 


JUNE

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris


COMING UP

Happiness: The Crooked Little Road to Semi-Ever After by Heather Harpham

Something in The Water by Catherine Steadman

Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone by Brene Brown

One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter by Scaachi Koul

Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao

The Au Pair by Emma Rous

Everything Happens for a Reason: and Other Lies I’ve Loved by Kate Bowler

I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Brown

Barking to The Choir: The Power of Radical Kinship by Greg Boyle

Ayesha at Last by Uzma Jalaluddin

The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh

Peacework: Prayer, resistance, and community by Henri Nouwen

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s